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Lesson Index: [ Introduction | Lesson Objective | Overview | Asymmetric Warfare—Definition | Alternative Operational Concepts | Anti-Access Strategy | Power Projection—A Military Strategy | Anti-access: A Strategy Threat | Anti-Access: Weapons Threat | Anti-access: Political Threats | Countering Anti-Access Strategies | Global Strike CONOPS | Summary ]

Title: Summary

Action: Screen begins with the following definition of asymmetric warfare by Lt Col Kenneth F. McKenzie, Jr., USMC National Defense University:

Asymmetric Warfare:

Leveraging inferior tactical or operational strength against American vulnerabilities to achieve disproportionate effect with the aim of undermining American will in order to achieve the asymmetric actor’s strategic objectives.

Voice: This lesson began with a broad look at asymmetric warfare.

Action: The relevant points in the quote are highlighted as they are mentioned in the narration:

Voice: Asymmetric warfare attempts to leverage a tactical event for disproportionate effect to undermine American will, thereby achieving the actor’s strategic objectives.

Action: Quote is removed and screen presents the cover of Joint Vision 20 20 in the top right corner of the screen and the cover of National Security Strategy of the United States of America in the bottom right corner of the screen. The first quote from Joint Vision 20 20 is shown on the upper left, beside its cover, and the second quote from National Security Strategy is shown on the lower left, next to its cover:

The strategic concepts of decisive force, power projection, overseas presence, and strategic agility will continue to govern our efforts to fulfill those responsibilities and meet the challenges of the future.
...the United States will require bases and stations within and beyond Western Europe and Northeast Asia, as well as temporary access arrangements for the long-distance deployment of U.S. forces.

Voice: Anti-access is an example of asymmetric warfare.

Action: All is faded out and replaced with the beginning force deployment graph from Anti-access: A Strategy Threat.

Voice: Opponents recognize as a vulnerability the time and access the US needs to employ its power projection strategies.

Action: All is faded out and replaced with the ending graphic from Anti-Access: Weapons Threat, with the three types of weapons showing.

Voice: With the increasing availability of commercial space-based C4ISR capabilities, advanced conventional weapons and weapons of mass destruction,...

Action: All is faded out and replaced with the ending force deployment graph from Anti-access: A Strategy Threat.

Voice: ...many countries are preparing to deny the US the time and access needed to protect its interests abroad.

Action: All is faded out and replaced with the ending graphic from Countering Anti-Access Strategies, with the sub-bullets grayed out. The remaining bullet points are:

Voice: To counter these strategies, the US is taking steps to prevent disproportionate effects, to minimize its vulnerabilities, and to accentuate its strengths.

Action: All is faded out and replaced with the sequence of graphics from Global Strike CONOPS. At the end of the narration, the following text is faded into the middle of the screen, overlaying the graphic:

Global Strike CONOPS

Voice: The Air Force presents the Global Strike CONOPS as its counter to anti-access strategies. By concentrating on the strengths of expeditionary global vigilance, reach, and power, the Air Force provides the means to “kick down the door” to allow follow-on joint forces the freedom to operate in pursuit of US objectives.

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