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Lesson Index: [ Introduction | Lesson Objective | Overview | Expeditionary Operations | Evolving National Security Strategy | Basing Changes | Basing Changes, continued | Current National Security Strategy | Temporary Basing | From Containment to Engagement | AEF Characteristics | Traditional Organization | AEF Organization | AEF Construct | Force Requirements | Force Composition | Force Composition, continued | AEF Employment Concept | Lead Wing | Lead Mobility Wing | AEFs in Joint Forces | AEF Cycle | AEF Cycle, continued | AEF Rotation Schedule | AEF Force Alignment | Expeditionary Combat Support | AEF Vision Across the Spectrum | AEF Issues | Lesson Recap | Summary | Quiz ]

Title: AEF Vision Across the Spectrum

Action: Screen begins with a graph with Time on the horizontal axis and Forces Committed on the vertical axis. The graph resembles a bell-shaped curve that has had the top portion of the bell flattened. The graph is divided vertically into four sections with dotted lines representing the boundaries of these sections. The sections are SSC, transition, Major Theater War, or MTW, and reconstitution, from left to right. Reconstitution begins at the top of the descent of the curve. The rest of the graph is divided equally into the first three sections.

Voice: This graphic illustrates the AEF concept across the spectrum of conflict.

Action: A horizontal dotted line appears on the graph at the point where the curve goes from relatively flat to starting to curve upward. This line represents the steady state and is shown when mentioned in the narration. A solid horizontal line representing the steady state limit appears on the graph slightly higher than the steady state line and is shown as mentioned in the narration.

Voice: The “steady state” of ongoing deployments is represented by the dotted line. The Air Force has a “steady state limit” on forces,...

Action: The following text is shown in a text box center screen, overlaying the graph.

The steady state limit on forces roughly totals the capabilities of two AEFs. This limit equates to approximately 20% of the Air Force’s combat coded force. A steady state limit also applies to LD/HD assets, but the Percentage they represent is governed by the Global Military Force Policy, or GMFP.

Voice: ...which totals the capabilities of about two AEFs. This limit equates to approximately 20% of the Air Force’s combat coded force, which is represented by the solid blue line. A steady state limit also applies to LD/HD assets, but their percentage is governed by the Global Military Force Policy or GMFP.

Action: The preceding text box is removed. The point on the graph where the steady state limit line meets the graph’s edge and the divider between SSC and transition, is indicated as being a trigger point. Another trigger point is shown to be where the divider between transition and MTW meets the graph.

Voice: A trigger point, as shown on the graphic is encountered if any of the following situations arise:...

Action: The following text is shown in a text box center screen, overlaying the graph.

A trigger point is encountered if any of the following occur:

Voice: ...when operational requirements cause the Air Force to employ more than two AEFs; when demands for use of LD/HD assets exceed that which is allowed in the GMFP; or when demands placed on the strategic mobility force go beyond steady state operations.

Action: The preceding text box is removed. An arrow labeled “surge” pointing from the first trigger point to the second trigger point along the upward edge of the graph is shown on screen.

Voice: At the trigger point, the Air Force transitions in a surge.

Action: The following text is shown in a text box center screen, overlaying the graph.

A surge is defined as continuing operations beyond what can be sustained indefinitely. Surge operations may escalate into a Major Theater War or MTW or become so intensive that existing OPLANs may be put at risk.

Voice: A surge is defined as continuing operations beyond what can be sustained indefinitely. Surge operations may escalate into a Major Theater War or MTW or become so intensive that existing OPLANs may be put at risk. Additionally, Air Force leaders may elect to “roll forward” into the next pair of AEFs to tap critical capabilities required to respond to an expanding crisis.

Action: The preceding text box is removed. The steady state limit dotted line curves downward at the divider between MTW and reconstitution at a point labeled selective disengagement. The line curves back up in the middle of the reconstitution section of the graph.

Voice: As the Air Force surpasses the surge point, national leadership may begin to seriously consider selective disengagement from steady state commitments. Selective disengagement would result in fewer forces being available to support ongoing requirements such as those in Southern Watch and Northern Watch. Once surge operations are initiated, the Air Force progresses beyond the limits of the AEF concept. At this point, Air Force senior leadership must inform the national leadership of requirements that exceed sustainable commitment levels.

Action: An arrow labeled reconstitution is shown on the graph beginning at the top of the descent of the curve and pointing downward along the edge of the curve towards the end of the graph.

Voice: Going beyond any trigger point should cause the Air Force to begin planning for some form of recovery and, if necessary, reconstitution.

Action: The following text is shown in a box in the middle of the screen, overlaying the graph. It is removed when the narration ends, showing the graph and all of its labels.

Factors to consider in reconstitution planning include:

Voice: Factors to consider in reconstitution planning include levels of consumables and munitions expended, magnitude and duration of the contingency, lost training, and personnel attrition rates.

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