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Title: Objectives in Vietnam

Voice: In 1965, President Johnson stated the fundamental premise for U.S. involvement in Vietnam: “Our objective is the independence of South Vietnam and its freedom from attack. We will do everything necessary to reach that objective, and we will do only what is absolutely necessary.” The broad political objective was simple and clear-cut. However, the military’s role, particularly the Air Force’s, in achieving that objective was much more obscure. As it turned out, the American military objective was not to defeat or destroy the enemy. Rather, the military objective was to persuade the enemy that he could not win. By any measure, this policy was a far cry from early Air Force doctrine that saw air power as a decisive factor of war.

Action: Screen begins with picture of President Johnson on screen lower left. When mentioned in the narration, the following quote is shown upper center screen, above Johnson picture:

Our objective is the independence of South Vietnam and its freedom from attack. We will do everything necessary to reach that objective, and we will do only what is absolutely necessary.

Action: When mentioned in the narration, the following footer is shown low center screen, as Pres. Johnson’s picture is removed:

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