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Lesson Index: [ Introduction | Overview | Differing Service Perspectives | Role of Air and Space Power | Employment of Air and Space Power | Targeting Responsibility | Functional vs Geographic Command | Summary ]

Title: Functional vs Geographic Command

Action: The background is a graphic of an aerial view of Earth from space. A large ring labeled “Joint Operations Area” is drawn around the land and the sea immediately surrounding it.

Voice: A service’s warfighting philosophy also affects its view of how commands should be organized.

Action: A portion of the land inside of the ring is sectioned off and labeled “Land Component AO” and a portion of the sea inside the ring is sectioned off and labeled “Maritime Component AO.” The following header is shown at the top center of the screen:

If you believe that individual component operations, synchronized in time and space, are key to success, then you probably advocate geographic command.

Voice: If you believe that individual component operations, synchronized in time and space, are key to success, then you probably advocate geographic command, in which a single commander controls all operations within a designated geographic area.

Action: The area inside the ring is highlighted and labeled “Air Component.” The following header replaces the one shown at the top center of the screen:

If you believe that integrated theater-level operations are the key to success in joint warfare, then you probably advocate functional command of air and space power under a single air and space commander.

Voice: Conversely, if you believe that integrated theater-level operations are the key to success in joint warfare, then you probably advocate functional command of air and space power under a single air and space commander. Issues involving targeting responsibility and functional versus geographic command form the basis for many of the key doctrinal “friction points” among the Services.

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