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Lesson Index: [ Introduction | Overview | Differing Service Perspectives | Role of Air and Space Power | Employment of Air and Space Power | Targeting Responsibility | Functional vs Geographic Command | Summary ]

Title: Overview

Action: The four shields of the joint services are shown in the four corners of the screen.

Voice: Before examining actual doctrinal issues, you must know the foundations of those issues.

Action: Show the following bullet point high on screen center:

Voice: First, it is important to remember that our sister services require air and space power in order to conduct successful operations.

Action: In the center of the screen, a faded picture representing airpower in the marines is shown. All shields except that of the marines are faded.

Voice: For example, the Marine Air-Ground Task Force is a combined arms team that consists of ground and air elements.

Action: In the center of the screen, a faded picture representing airpower in the army is shown. All shields except that of the army are faded.

Voice: Second, Army doctrine articulated in Field Manual 3-0 relies on the full spectrum of air and space power in its operational concepts.

Action: In the center of the screen, a faded picture representing airpower in the navy is shown. All shields except that of the navy are faded.

Voice: Finally, the Navy employs air and space power as its primary power projection tool.

Action: All shields are no longer faded. Show the following bullet point low on screen center:

Voice: It stands to reason, then, that each service desires a degree of control over the air and space power within its areas of operation, whether its own organic air, or that provided by another service.

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