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Lesson Index: [ Introduction | Lesson Objective | Overview | Air and Space Power Characteristics | The Seven Tenets | Centralized Control and Decentralized Execution | Applying the Tenet | Example: North Africa | Example: Battle of Britain | Flexibility and Versatility | Example: Multi-role Employment | Example: Parallel Operations | Priority | Example: Yom Kippur War | Synergistic Effects | Example: Operation ENDURING FREEDOM | WWII-Control the Air | Persistence | Example: Huels Synthetic Rubber Plant | Example: Operation DESERT STORM | Concentration | Example: Battle of Britain | Example: Deliberate Force | Balance | Example: Yom Kippur War | Summary | Quiz ]

Title: Persistence

Action: Present the following text along the top of the screen, along with images of a B-52, and targets that were struck in Vietnam, to show how American forces persisted and continued to destro Vietnamese infrastructure:

Persistence ensures the prolonged effect of air and space operations

Voice: Persistence, the next tenet, is a critical element in ensuring the prolonged effect of air and space operations. It is the intent of most modern air and space operations to quickly attain objectives through swift, parallel, and decisive blows to the adversary's operational and strategic centers of gravity. However, on some occasions, factors such as enemy resilience, effective defenses, or environmental concerns prevent U.S. forces from persisting. In many situations, air and space operations provide the most effective and efficient means for attaining national objectives.

Action: Replace the line of text above with the following text along the top of the screen, also present more images of war this time with Desert Storm pictures:

Commanders must persist in executing air and space operations and resist pressure to divert resources to other areas

Voice: Therefore, commanders must persist in executing air and space operations and resist pressure to divert resources to other efforts, unless such diversions are vital either to attaining theater goals or ensuring the survival of an element of the joint force. Given sufficient time, a resourceful enemy can circumvent even the most devastating strategic effects. (6) The goal is to persist in applying pressure and not allow the enemy that time.

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